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Astronomia : LA NASA PLANEA BOMBARDEAR LA LUNA ESTE A脩O
Enviado por asimondini el 7/10/2009 22:20:00 (3463 Lecturas)
Astronomia

LOS ASTRONAUTAS DICEN QUE EL HECHO PODRIA CREAR GRAVES CONFLICTOS CON CIVILIZACIONES EXTRATERRESTRES


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Astronautas Buzz Aldrin y Neil Amstrong


La NASA pretende bombardear nuestra luna el 9 de octubre de 2009, para ello, ha enviado al espacio un arma cin茅tica cargando dos toneladas de explosivos con la finalidad de crear un crter de cinco millas, y ver si sale agua del interior de la luna. Este ambicioso proyecto que ya ha iniciado la NASA es contrario a la ley que proh颅be la modificaci贸n ambiental de los cuerpos celestes.
Los legendarios astronautas Buzz Aldrin y Neil Armstrong en unas declaraciones han dicho que vieron extraterrestres en la luna y que si se hace uso de las bombas podr颅an molestar a estas civilizaciones y con ello desencadenar un conflicto de proporciones descomunales con civilizaciones extraterrestres.

Si la verdadera intenci贸n de la misi贸n LRO/LCROSS de bombardear la luna es crear hostilidad con los extraterrestres y sus asentamientos, entonces la NASA y, por lo tanto, el gobierno de los EE.UU. pueden ser culpables de desencadenar una guerra espacial y estar颅an atentando contra los convenios de Ginebra a los que las naciones deben de ampararse.

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Representaci贸n grfica del orbitador lunar LCROSS liberando un cohete Centaur con 2 toneladas de explosivos contra la luna.


TRASLADO DEL ESPACIO ULTRATERRESTRE DE LAS NACIONES UNIDAS. (en ingl茅s)

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RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
2222 (XXI). Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies
The General Assembly,

Having considered the report of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space covering its work during 1966, 1 and in particular the work accomplished by the Legal Subcommittee during its fifth session, held at Geneva from 12 July to 4 August and at New York from 12 September to 16 September,

Noting further the progress achieved through subsequent consultations among States Members of the United Nations,

Reaffirming the importance of international cooperation in the field of activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and the importance of developing the rule of law in this new area of human endeavour,

1. Commends the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, the text of which is annexed to the present resolution;

2. Requests the Depositary Governments to open the Treaty for signature and ratification at the earliest possible date;

3. Expresses its hope for the widest possible adherence to this Treaty;

4. Requests the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space:

(a) To continue to work on the elaboration of an agreement on liability for damages caused by the launching of objects into outer space and an agreement on assistance to and return of astronauts and space vehicles, which are on the agenda of the Committee;

(b) To begin at the same time the study of questions relative to the definition of outer space and the utilization of outer space and celestial bodies, including the various implications of space communications;

(c) To report on the progress of its work to the General Assembly at its twenty-second session.

1499th plenary meeting,
19 December 1966.


ANNEX
Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States
in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including
the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies

The States Parties to this Treaty,

Inspired by the great prospects opening up before mankind as a result of man's entry into outer space,

Recognizing the common interest of all mankind in the progress of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes,

Believing that the exploration and use of outer space should be carried on for the benefit of all peoples irrespective of the degree of their economic or scientific development,

Desiring to contribute to broad international co-operation in the scientific as well as the legal aspects of the exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes,

Believing that such co-operation will contribute to the development of mutual understanding and to the strengthening of friendly relations between States and peoples,

Recalling resolution 1962 (XVIII), entitled "Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space",which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 13 December 1963,

Recalling resolution 1884 (XVIII), calling upon States to refrain from placing in orbit around the earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction or from installing such weapons on celestial bodies, which was adopted unanimously by the United Nations General Assembly on 17 October 1963,

Taking account of United Nations General Assembly resolution 110 (II) of 3 November 1947, which condemned propaganda designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to the peace, breach of the peace or act of aggression, and considering that the aforementioned resolution is applicable to outer space,

Convinced that a Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, will further the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations,

Have agreed on the following:

Article I
The exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind.

Outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law, and there shall be free access to all areas of celestial bodies.

There shall be freedom of scientific investigation in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, and States shall facilitate and encourage international co-operation in such investigation.

Article II
Outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means.

Article III
States Parties to the Treaty shall carry on activities in the exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, in the interest of maintaining international peace and security and promoting international co-operation and understanding.

Article IV
States Parties to the Treaty undertake not to place in orbit around the earth any objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction, install such weapons on celestial bodies, or station such weapons in outer space in any other manner.

The moon and other celestial bodies shall be used by all States Parties to the Treaty exclusively for peaceful purposes. The establishment of military bases, installations and fortifications, the testing of any type of weapons and the conduct of military manoeuvres on celestial bodies shall be forbidden. The use of military personnel for scientific research or for any other peaceful purposes shall not be prohibited. The use of any equipment or facility necessary for peaceful exploration of the moon and other celestial bodies shall also not be prohibited.

Article V
States Parties to the Treaty shall regard astronauts as envoys of mankind in outer space and shall render to them all possible assistance in the event of accident, distress, or emergency landing on the territory of another State Party or on the high seas. When astronauts make such a landing, they shall be safely and promptly returned to the State of registry of their space vehicle.

In carrying on activities in outer space and on celestial bodies, the astronauts of one State Party shall render all possible assistance to the astronauts of other States Parties.

States Parties to the Treaty shall immediately inform the other States Parties to the Treaty or the Secretary-General of the United Nations of any phenomena they discover in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, which could constitute a danger to the life or health of astronauts.

Article VI
States Parties to the Treaty shall bear international responsibility for national activities in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by governmental agencies or by non-governmental entities, and for assuring that national activities are carried out in conformity with the provisions set forth in the present Treaty. The activities of non-governmental entities in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, shall require authorization and continuing supervision by the appropriate State Party to the Treaty. When activities are carried on in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, by an international organization, responsibility for compliance with this Treaty shall be borne both by the international organization and by the States Parties to the Treaty participating in such organization.

Article VII
Each State Party to the Treaty that launches or procures the launching of an object into outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, and each State Party from whose territory or facility an object is launched, is internationally liable for damage to another State Party to the Treaty or to its natural or juridical persons by such object or its component parts on the Earth, in air or in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies.

Article VIII
A State Party to the Treaty on whose registry an object launched into outer space is carried shall retain jurisdiction and control over such object, and over any personnel thereof, while in outer space or on a celestial body. Ownership of objects launched into outer space, including objects landed or constructed on a celestial body, and of their component parts, is not affected by their presence in outer space or on a celestial body or by their return to the Earth. Such objects or component parts found beyond the limits of the State Party to the Treaty on whose registry they are carried shall be returned to that State Party, which shall, upon request, furnish identifying data prior to their return.

Article IX
In the exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, States Parties to the Treaty shall be guided by the principle of co-operation and mutual assistance and shall conduct all their activities in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, with due regard to the corresponding interests of all other States Parties to the Treaty. States Parties to the Treaty shall pursue studies of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, and conduct exploration of them so as to avoid their harmful contamination and also adverse changes in the environment of the Earth resulting from the introduction of extraterrestrial matter and, where necessary, shall adopt appropriate measures for this purpose. If a State Party to the Treaty has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by it or its nationals in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities of other States Parties in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, it shall undertake appropriate international consultations before proceeding with any such activity or experiment. A State Party to the Treaty which has reason to believe that an activity or experiment planned by another State Party in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, would cause potentially harmful interference with activities in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, may request consultation concerning the activity or experiment.

Article X
In order to promote international co-operation in the exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, in conformity with the purposes of this Treaty, the States Parties to the Treaty shall consider on a basis of equality any requests by other States Parties to the Treaty to be afforded an opportunity to observe the flight of space objects launched by those States. The nature of such an opportunity for observation and the conditions under which it could be afforded shall be determined by agreement between the States concerned.

Article XI
In order to promote international co-operation in the peaceful exploration and use of outer space, States Parties to the Treaty conducting activities in outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, agree to inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations as well as the public and the international scientific community, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable, of the nature, conduct, locations and results of such activities. On receiving the said information, the Secretary-General of the United Nations should be prepared to disseminate it immediately and effectively.

Article XII
All stations, installations, equipment and space vehicles on the moon and other celestial bodies shall be open to representatives of other States Parties to the Treaty on a basis of reciprocity. Such representatives shall give reasonable advance notice of a projected visit, in order that appropriate consultations may be held and that maximum precautions may betaken to assure safety and to avoid interference with normal operations in the facility to be visited.

Article XIII
The provisions of this Treaty shall apply to the activities of States Parties to the Treaty in the exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, whether such activities are carried on by a single State Party to the Treaty or jointly with other States, including cases where they are carried on within the framework of international intergovernmental organizations.

Any practical questions arising in connection with activities carried on by international intergovernmental organizations in the exploration and use of outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies, shall be resolved by the States Parties to the Treaty either with the appropriate international organization or with one or more States members of that international organization, which are Parties to this Treaty.

Article XIV
1. This Treaty shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign this Treaty before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article may accede to it at anytime.

2. This Treaty shall be subject to ratification by signatory States. Instruments of ratification and instruments of accession shall be deposited with the Governments of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments.

3. This Treaty shall enter into force upon the deposit of instruments of ratification by five Governments including the Governments designated as Depositary Governments under this Treaty.

4. For States whose instruments of ratification or accession are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Treaty, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession.

5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, the date of deposit of each instrument of ratification of and accession to this Treaty, the date of its entry into force and other notices.

6. This Treaty shall be registered by the Depositary Governments pursuant to Article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations.

Article XV
Any State Party to the Treaty may propose amendments to this Treaty. Amendments shall enter into force for each State Party to the Treaty accepting the amendments upon their acceptance by a majority of the States Parties to the Treaty and thereafter for each remaining State Party to the Treaty on the date of acceptance by it.

Article XVI
Any State Party to the Treaty may give notice of its withdrawal from the Treaty one year after its entry into force by written notification to the Depositary Governments. Such withdrawal shall take effect one year from the date of receipt of this notification.

Article XVII
This Treaty, of which the English, Russian, French, Spanish and Chinese texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the Depositary Governments. Duly certified copies of this Treaty shall be transmitted by the Depositary Governments to the Governments of the signatory and acceding States.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF the undersigned, duly authorized, have signed this Treaty.

DONE in triplicate, at the cities of London, Moscow and Washington, the twenty-seventh day of January, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
1. Official Records of the General Assembly, Twenty-first Session, agenda items 30, 89 and 91, document A/6431.


El Tratado del Espacio Ultraterrestre de las Naciones Unidas (en ingl茅s), que los EE.UU. ha ratificado, exige que "La luna y otros cuerpos celestes sean utilizados por todos los Estados exclusivamente para fines pac颅ficos. El establecimiento de bases militares, instalaciones y fortificaciones, y las pruebas de cualquier tipo de armas, al igual que la realizaci贸n de maniobras militares en los cuerpos celestes estn prohibidas."聺 98 naciones han ratificado el acuerdo y 125 naciones han firmado el Tratado del Espacio Ultraterrestre de Naciones Unidas.

La NASA lanz贸 la misi贸n LCROSS el pasado 18 de junio de los corrientes. Seg煤n especifica un reporte, "Cuando sobrevuele el hemisferio sur, y de acuerdo con los objetivos de la misi贸n LCROSS, la nave har uso de sus instrumentos de alta precisi贸n, el orbitador tomar imgenes de acercamiento del terreno, con la finalidad de localizar en el polo Sur de la luna, un crter lo suficientemente oscuro y a la vez no muy profundo, sobre el cual se llevar a cabo el bombardeo".

Para realizar esta operaci贸n, el orbitador LCROSS guiar un cohete CENTAUR cargando 2 toneladas de explosivos a ser utilizados contra su objetivo. El cohete impactar al crter seleccionado a una velocidad de 5,600 mph, creando tras s颅, un nuevo crter el cual se espera sea de unas 5 millas a la redonda. El impacto contra la luna est programado para el 9 de octubre del 2009.

OPERATORIA DE LA MISION


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Lanzamiento del LRO y el LCROSS el 18 de junio del 2009 desde el centro espacial de la NASA en Cabo Ca帽averal, Florida.


El cohete Centaur, al cargar 2 toneladas de explosivos califica como un arma cin茅tica espacial. La justificaci贸n alegada por la NASA es que la LCROSS trazar mapas para posible sitios de alunizajes; insiste en que los fines son pac颅ficos y que el motivo central es el detectar agua para asegurar futuros lanzamientos a la luna y el establecimiento de bases y colonias.

La identificaci贸n del agua es muy importante para el futuro de las actividades humanas en la Luna. El impacto ocasionar la expulsi贸n de materiales desde el crter hacia el exterior, los materiales expulsados podrn ser analizados en busca de agua. La NASA ha declarado oficialmente que: "Los EE.UU., la NASA, y cient颅ficos rusos no han confirmado presencia extraterrestre en la luna"聺 y que por lo tanto no van a molestar a nadie, y la tarea es meramente cient颅fica.

La realidad es que s颅 que existen informes confirmando la presencia extraterrestre en la luna, tanto por parte de astronautas de EE.UU. que han viajado a la luna, como por parte de empleados de la NASA, y de cient颅ficos sovi茅ticos, que ellos (NASA) dicen "desconocer". La National Security Agency inform贸 hace unos a帽os que en la cara oculta de la luna exist颅an bases extraterrestres.

En un documental de televisi贸n realizado en el 2006, titulado "Apollo 11: The Untold Story", el astronauta Buzz Aldrin admiti贸 por primera vez p煤blicamente que los astronautas vieron ovnis en su viaje a la Luna, pero que no se les permiti贸 discutir la informaci贸n a trav茅s de los canales abiertos de transmisi贸n de la NASA durante la misi贸n. Aldrin luego decidi贸 no hablar porque pens贸 que la informaci贸n podr颅a ocasionar pnico en la poblaci贸n mundial."聺



Fuentes: Examiner, NASA, Scientific American y San Francisco Gate


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Preprese. Este viernes 9 de octubre, la NASA har impactar una nave espacial y su cohete de impulso contra la Luna en busca de agua. Y se podr ver desde la Tierra!

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Octubre 5, 2009: Solamente imag颅nelo. Una nave espacial cae a gran velocidad desde lo alto del cielo nocturno, choca contra el suelo y explota. Un penacho de polvo se eleva nuevamente hacia el cielo, haciendo que sus ojos dirijan la mirada hasta una seguna nave, en rpida persecuci贸n. Cuatro minutos ms tarde, esa nave tambi茅n se estrella. Es una lluvia de naves espaciales!

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P贸ngase un casco de constructor y preprese para la acci贸n pues este viernes, 9 de octubre, lo que acaba de imaginarse ocurrir realmente "铆垄鈥毬漼 usted puede conseguir un asiento en primera fila para verlo.

Derecha: Una visualizaci贸n por computadora de la nave LCROSS estrellndose contra la Luna este 9 de octubre. Cr茅dito: NASA/Ames

El sitio elegido para el impacto es el crter Cabeus, cerca del polo sur lunar. La NASA est guiando al Sat茅lite de Observaci贸n y Detecci贸n de Crteres Lunares (Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite 贸 "LCROSS", en idioma ingl茅s) y a su cohete de impulso Centaur hacia el fondo de un crter, para intentar un espectacular doble impacto, dise帽ado con el prop贸sito de "desenterrar" pistas sobre el agua lunar.

Hay dos maneras de ver el espectculo.

Primero, sintonice NASA TV. La agencia espacial realizar una transmisi贸n en directo de la acci贸n desde la Luna, y la cobertura del evento comenzar el d颅a viernes por la ma帽ana, a las 3:15 PDT (Hora Diurna del Pac颅fico), o 10:15 UT (Hora Universal). Durante la primera hora de transmisi贸n, previa al impacto, habr comentarios de expertos, informes sobre el estado de la misi贸n proporcionados por el control de dicha misi贸n, imgenes captadas por las cmaras de la nave espacial y animaciones basadas en telemetr颅a.

Los impactos en s颅 comenzarn a las 4:30 de la ma帽ana PDT (Hora Diurna del Pac颅fico) u 11:30 UT (Hora Universal). El cohete Centaur impactar primero, transformando 2.200 kilogramos de masa y 10 mil millones de julios de energ颅a cin茅tica en un destello cegador de luz y calor. Los investigadores esperan que el impacto forme un penacho de polvo de hasta 10 kil贸metros de altura.

A corta distancia, la nave principal de la misi贸n LCROSS fotografiar la colisi贸n para NASA TV y luego volar justo a trav茅s del penacho de polvo. Los espectr贸metros ubicados a bordo de la nave analizarn el penacho iluminado por la luz solar en busca de se帽ales de agua (H2O), fragmentos de mol茅culas de agua (OH), sales, arcillas, minerales hidratados y otras mol茅culas orgnicas de distintos tipos.

"Si hay agua all颅, o algo igualmente interesante, lo encontraremos", dice Tony Colaprete, del Centro Ames, de la NASA, quien es el investigador principal de la misi贸n.

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Arriba: El polo sur lunar tal y como se ver en la noche del impacto. Cr茅dito de la fotograf颅a: Observatorio Tortugas NMSU / MSFC. [Imagen ampliada]

Luego ser el turno de la nave principal para hacer su clavado mortal. Cuatro minutos despu茅s del "alunizaje" del cohete Centaur, el sat茅lite LCROSS, de 700 kilogramos de peso, se estrellar en un punto cercano, generando de este modo otro penacho de polvo, aunque ms peque帽o, sobre la orilla del crter Cabeus.

El Telescopio Espacial Hubble, el Orbitador de Reconocimiento Lunar (LRO, por su sigla en idioma ingl茅s), y cientos de telescopios grandes y peque帽os en la Tierra inspeccionarn los dos penachos en busca de se帽ales de agua y de lo inesperado.

Y de este modo llegamos a la segunda manera de ver el espectculo: Use su telescopio.

"Esperamos que los penachos de polvo sean visibles a trav茅s de telescopios para aficionados de tama帽o mediano (de 10 pulgadas o ms grandes), dice Brian Day, del Centro NASA / AMES. Day es astr贸nomo aficionado y jefe del programa de Educaci贸n y Divulgaci贸n de la misi贸n LCROSS. "Las explosiones iniciales probablemente no se puedan ver porque las paredes del crter las taparn, pero los penachos de polvo se levantarn hasta una altura suficiente sobre la orilla del crter como para poder ser vistos desde la Tierra".

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EL Oc茅ano Pac颅fico y las zonas ubicadas al Oeste de Am茅rica del Norte se vern favorecidos por la oscuridad y, por lo tanto, tendrn una buena vista de la Luna en el momento del impacto. Hawai es el mejor sitio para verlo y en un muy cercano segundo lugar se encuentran los estados de la costa del Pac颅fico de Estados Unidos. Cualquier lugar al Oeste del R颅o Mississippi, sin embargo, es un sitio con buen potencial para realizar una observaci贸n.

Derecha: La cara de la Tierra que apuntar hacia la Luna en el momento del impacto. [Imagen ampliada] [Recomendaciones para los observadores]

Cuando los penachos emerjan del crter Cabeus, estarn iluminados por la luz solar, que ba帽ar el terreno polar. Sin embargo, el crter en s颅 estar en tinieblas, ensombrecido eternamente por sus propias paredes. "Eso es bueno", dice Day. "Las sombras del crter proveern un fondo oscuro que permitir apreciar mejor los penachos iluminados por el Sol".

En una de las fases iniciales de la planificaci贸n de la misi贸n, los cient颅ficos esperaban estrellar la nave contra un crter ms cercano al limbo lunar, de tal modo que los penachos brillaran mucho comparados con la oscuridad del cielo nocturno, proveyendo de este modo un contraste mximo para los observadores en la Tierra. No obstante, los datos obtenidos recientemente por el Orbitador de Reconocimiento Lunar, de la NASA, as颅 como por la nave japonesa Kaguya y por la sonda Chandrayaan-1, de la India, alteraron aquellos planes.

"Acabamos de enterarnos de que Cabeus podr颅a contener dep贸sitos relativamente abundantes de hidr贸geno y/o de agua congelada", dice Colaprete. "Cabeus no est tan cerca del limbo lunar como hubi茅semos querido, pero parece ofrecernos la mejor oportunidad para hallar H2O".

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El equipo de la LCROSS espera que muchas personas "铆垄鈥毬漚ficionados y profesionales por igual"铆垄鈥毬 observen y fotograf颅en los penachos. "Cuantos ms ojos, mejor", dice Day. "Recuerde que nunca hemos hecho esto antes. No estamos 100% seguros de lo que suceder, y puede haber muchas sorpresas".

Derecha: Haga clic en la imagen para hallar un evento de observaci贸n abierto al p煤blico cerca de su localidad. [Ms informaci贸n]

El veterano astr贸nomo Kurt Fisher ha preparado una presentaci贸n de 13 MB con el fin de ayudar a los astr贸nomos aficionados a localizar y a ver los penachos: descrguelo (en idioma ingl茅s). Tambi茅n hay un grupo de observadores de la nave LCROSS en Internet, donde los novatos pueden leer art颅culos introductorios y dialogar con otros observadores.

"Esta es un magn颅fica oportunidad para los ciudadanos cient颅ficos de unirse a la NASA en su proceso de descubrimiento", dice Day, quien invita a los observadores a enviar sus imgenes al Portal de Ciencia Ciudadana (Citizen Science Site, en idioma ingl茅s) de la nave LCROSS. "Es una gran aventura, y cualquiera puede participar".

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